David Brider (davidbrider) wrote,
David Brider
davidbrider

Plastic bubbles in a Cornish clay pit.

So, m'beloved huntingospray and I spent this afternoon traipsing around the clay pit where the BBC filmed the Magrathea sequences of The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy, now in its alternative guise of the Eden Project. Some sort of proper post with lots of pics may follow, but suffice it to say there were no signs of any sperm whales that had perished prematurely whilst trying to befriend the ground, nor of any angry bowls of petunias. We did see this rather bizarre robot-like creature, but were unable to get him to comment on whether he gets on with other robots:



Also, this rather wonderful Heath-Robinson-esque machine which exists for the sole purpose of trying to crack open a hazelnut with a sledgehammer:



(Which got me thinking...youngsters today probably don't know who Heath-Robinson was, do they? I spent many a happy hour perusing a book full of his wonderfully bizarre pictures when I was staying at my grandma & grandpa's house as a nipper...)

Speaking of the works of Douglas Adams, the environmental campaigner in him would, no doubt, have approved of the project as a whole (I'm not sure if he lived to see it completed). A quotation of his was featured at one point:

"The disadvantages involved pulling lots of black sticky slime from out of the ground where it had been safely hidden out of harm’s way, turning it into tar to cover the land with, smoke to fill the air with and pouring the rest into the sea, all seemed to outweigh the advantages of being able to get more quickly from one place to the other - particularly when the place you arrived at had probably become, as a result of this, very similar to the place you had left, i.e., covered with tar, full of smoke, and short of fish."

Should anyone wish to see the pics I took during our visit (they are in no way exhaustive, just those things which made me think "ooh, I should take a photo of this...), they can be found here on Facebook.

(Oh, also? This:



We sow the seed, nature grows the seed, and we eat the seed. Or, in the case of the Krynoids, we sow the seed, nature grows the seed, and we get eaten by the seed. *ahem*)
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