David Brider (davidbrider) wrote,
David Brider
davidbrider

I probably shouldn't think about things *this* much...

...but I'm a pedant, okay?

I've noticed an ad for Robbie Williams' new greatest hits compilation, In and Out of Consciousness.

It makes much of the fact that he's celebrating 20 years in music. The CD cover even states, "The Greatest Hits 1990 - 2010".

Now...that's not strictly true.

I mean, sure, he joined Take That in 1990, but they didn't start releasing records until 1991 - and their first real, landmark, make-an-impression-on-the-public release was It Only Takes A Minute, released in June 1992. [He says, checking on Wiki.] So really, properly, 20 years in music, but only 18 years of actual hits.

But then the album itself focuses almost exclusively on Robbie's solo career (I assume all the tracks are bona fide hits, or at the very least single releases; I haven't the time to check). Of the 39 tracks present on the very generous double CD, there are, admittedly, two recent co-writes with Gary Barlow, but the only two pre-1997 tracks are Take That's Everything Changes from 1994, and Robbie's cover of George Michael's Freedom, from 1996. The latter, granted, is its first time on one of Robbie's albums, but the former is hardly representative of the many hits Robbie enjoyed during his time with Take That.

So, to my mind, the "Greatest Hits 1990 - 2010" is a bit of a fib, really. Not massively so, but enough that I kinda feel the ad, and the wording on the release itself, is a bit of a cheat. If I felt more strongly about it, I'd consider contacting the ASA about it...

And don't get me started on Ultimate Pet Shop Boys, which is hardly "ultimate," more "selected highlights of their career to date" (although the bonus DVD that comes with the special edition looks like it should be rather nice).
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